The wire shoe project

_BAI2662 _BAI2663 _BAI2664 _BAI2666 _BAI2667 _BAI2668shoes

This is a project I did for my first 3D class at RISD. We were given the opportunity to choose from different types of wires to make a shoe structure that is 2.5 times bigger of the original shoe. We needed to bring in our own shoes and study their forms, shapes, structures and making techniques, and then narrow down to one. I had mine eyes on this TOMS Crochet shoe from the beginning, and even when my instructor Mickey (he is the best!) tried to convince me to choose a sneaker instead, I still insisted on re-making the complicated crochet shoe.

I soon understood why Mickey thought it was a difficult task:

1. This shoe has basically no supporting structure because it relies on the foot inside it.

2. TOMS’ shoes have a unique form so I would either fail or nail it.

3. The particular type that I was interested in has the one of the most complicated patterns which would be hard to do with wires.

After sketching the shoe in 2.5 times bigger version on a sheet of paper, I started making decision of selecting parts that I would employ in my wire shoe, changing patterns so it would work with wires and adding supportive structure to support the shoe. Of course I have to be open to change while I was making the shoe.

For the wire selection, I used nickel wire to imitate the delicate crochet and the ivory tint. It was one of the softest wire that I could find in our 3D store that enabled me to do some detailed work. I also used aluminum wire for the bottom and the supporting crossing structure, for it was thicker but still soft enough to blend in with rest of the shoe.

I am happy with the end result, and according to Mickey, he was pleasantly surprised too.

Of course, if I do it again there will be a few things that I would do differently. For example, the bottom part could be made with more details, and the little TOMS tag on the side should be included (with some even thinner and softer wire), and the whole scale could be more accurate too.

Copyright © 2013 Whitney Yu Bai All Rights Reserved

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